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in conversation with Michael Shapiro

Tim Cahill is the author of nine books–one of which, Jaguars Ripped My Flesh, National Geographic named as one of the 100 best adventure/travel books ever written.

Tim is a pioneer of literary adventure writing. One of the founders of Outside, he is the author of its long-running “Out There” column, and an editor-at-large. His work also appears in National Geographic Adventure, the New York Times Book Review, and other national publications.

Tim’s travel books include, A Wolverine Is Eating My Leg, and Pass the Butterworms, Road Fever and Hold the Enlightenment. He also wrote the introduction for The Best Travel Writing, Volume 9: True Stories from Around the World. He is also the co-author of four IMAX documentary screenplays, two of which were nominated for Academy Awards. He lives in Montana, in the shadow of the Crazy Mountains.

Michael Shapiro writes about travel, food, entertainment, art, and environmental issues for magazines and newspapersHe is the author of The Creative Spark, a collection of interviews with many of the world’s most creative people, as well as A Sense of Place featuring conversations with leading travel writers.

in conversation with Elaine Petrocelli

Ann Patchett‘s The Dutch House explores the bond between two siblings, the house of their childhood, and a past that will not let them go. It’s a story of a paradise lost–one that digs deeply into questions of inheritance, love and forgiveness, of how we want to see ourselves and of who we really are.

Ann is the author of seven novels, The Patron Saint of LiarsTaftThe Magician’s AssistantBel CantoRunState of Wonder, and Commonwealth. She was the editor of Best American Short Stories, 2006, and has written three books of nonfiction–Truth & Beauty, about her friendship with the writer Lucy Grealy, What Now? an expansion of her graduation address at Sarah Lawrence College, and This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, a collection of essays examining the theme of commitment. In 2019, she published her first children’s book, Lambslide, illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser.

In November, 2011, Ann opened Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tennessee, with her business partner Karen Hayes. She lives in Nashville with her husband, Karl VanDevender, and their dog, Sparky.

in conversation with Mark Nieker

Dominique Crenn‘s Rebel Chef: In Search of What Matters is an honest, revealing look at one woman’s evolution from a daring young chef to a respected activist–all as she makes a place for herself in the kitchen, and in the world.

Dominique began her formal kitchen training in San Francisco in 1988. In 1997, she made culinary history as the first female executive chef in Indonesia, heading the kitchen at the InterContinental Hotel in Jakarta. She returned to California in 1998 as executive chef of Manhattan Country Club in Manhattan Beach. She then opened Abode in Santa Monica, but it was Luce that brought her back to San Francisco and where she earned her first Michelin star in 2009.

Atelier Crenn debuted in January 2011, quickly earning its first Michelin star and a second by October 2012. Dominique is the first female chef in the United States to receive a second coveted star and has maintained the distinction through 2018. She was named “Best Female Chef” in 2016 by World’s 50 Best.Fashioned after the food of her childhood in Brittany, she opened Petit Crenn in 2015, followed by Bar Crenn in 2018.

in conversation with Elaine Petrocelli

Dr. Jill Biden‘s Where the Light Enters is a candid, heartwarming glimpse into the creation of a beloved American family, and the life of the woman at its center.

Jill, the wife of former vice president Joe Biden is the New York Times bestselling author of Where the Light Enters and her first children’s book, Don’t Forget, God Bless Our Troops.

She works as a community college professor. She served as second lady of the United States from 2009 to 2017. During the Obama-Biden administration, she advocated for military families, community colleges, the fight against cancer, and the education of women and girls around the world. Dr. Biden and her husband founded the Biden Foundation and the Biden Cancer Initiative.

Her forthcoming release, Joey, is the first ever picture book about the young life of Joe Biden, the 47th Vice President of the United States, and includes never before told family stories about the presidential candidate and former vice president’s childhood.

Jill mother of three and grandmother of five, she and her husband live in Wilmington, Delaware, with their two dogs, Champ and Major.

Elaine Petrocelli is co-owner of Book Passage, the fiercely independent bookstore in Corte Madera, California, and at the San Francisco Ferry Building . Over the past 44 years, Book Passage has hosted more than 10,000 classes, conferences, and author events, featuring Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Salman Rushdie, John McCain, Al Gore, Jimmy Carter, Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and thousands of new writers. She hosts of the Conversations with Authors series with Isabel Allende, Khaled Hosseini, Anne Lamott, Dave Eggers and other great writers.

in conversation with Jacqueline Winspear

Elizabeth George’s Mastering the Process: From Idea to Novel offers readers a master class in the art and science of crafting a novel––a subject she knows well, having taught creative writing both nationally and internationally for over thirty years.

Elizabeth’s crime novels have been celebrated by the New York Times and translated into 30 languages and featured on television by the BBC. She is also the author of a young adult series set on the island where she lives in the state of Washington.

A longtime instructor of creative writing, she has taught at colleges, universities, writers’ retreats, and conferences internationally. She most recently taught a live online creative writing class for Hedgebrook Women’s Writers’ Retreat on Whidbey Island. She is the recipient of the Anthony Award, the Agatha Award, France’s Grand Prix di Literatture Policiere, and Germany’s MIMI. She has twice been nominated for an Edgar Award, and she is the recipient of an honorary doctorate of humane letters from California State University Fullerton, and an honorary MFA from Northwest Institute of Language Arts (Whidbey Island MFA Program).

She has also written the longtime best selling creative writing book Write Away, has edited two volumes of short stories, and is the executive chair of the Elizabeth George Foundation, which makes grants to poets, emerging playwrights, and unpublished novelists.

Jason Rosenthal’s My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me is an inspiring memoir of life, love, loss, and new beginnings by the widower of bestselling children’s author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal, whose last of act of love before her death was setting the stage for her husband’s life without her in the viral New York Times Modern Love column, “You May Want to Marry My Husband.”

Jason and Paris are co-authors of the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dear Boy, the #1 New York Times bestselling follow-up picture book to the #1 New York Times bestseller Dear Girl, co-written by Paris and her mother Amy Krouse Rosenthal.

Jason is also the board chair of the Amy Krouse Rosenthal Foundation, which supports childhood literacy and research in early detection of ovarian cancer. A lawyer, public speaker, and devoted father of three, he is passionate about helping others find ways to fill their blank space as he continues to fill his own. Jason resides in Chicago, a city he is proud to call home.

in conversation with Anne Lamott

Janine Urbaniak Reid’s The Opposite of Certainty is the story of her reluctant journey beyond easy answers and platitudes. Drawn deeply and against her will into herself, and into the eternal questions we all ask, she discovers hidden reserves of strength, humor, and a no-matter-what faith that looks nothing like she thought it would.

Janine writes about her imperfect life, what connects us, and addresses the question of what it means to love fiercely in a sometimes dangerous and always uncertain world.

Anne Lamott is the author of seven novels, Hard Laughter, Rosie, Joe Jones, Blue Shoe, All New People, Crooked Little Heart, and Imperfect Birds. She has also written several bestselling books of nonfiction, including, Operating Instructions, an account of life as a single mother during her son’s first year; Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son’s First Son; and the classic book on writing; Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life.

in conversation with Paula Farmer

Julie Lythcott-Haims is the author of the anti-helicopter parenting manifesto How to Raise an Adult as well as the critically-acclaimed and prose poetry memoir Real American, which illustrates her experience with racism and her journey toward self-acceptance.

Julie believes in humans and is deeply interested in what gets in our way. Her TED Talk on the raising children was one of the top talks of 2016, and in 2020 she became a regular correspondent with CBS This Morning on parenting. Her second book, Real American, illustrates her experience with racism and her journey toward self-acceptance.

She wrote the foreword for Writing Memoir, a book of writing prompts developed by Julie and her colleagues at the San Francisco Writers’ Grotto for those hungry to share their lived experiences. A fourth book, It’s Your Turn: The Real How-to on Adulting, will be out in April 2021.

Police Brutality and the Movement for Change

a panel discussion moderated by Paula Farmer

 

Dani McClain reports on race and reproductive health. She is a contributing writer at The Nation and a fellow with Type Media Center. In 2018, she received a James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism. Brian Copeland is an award-winning actor, comedian, author, playwright, television and radio talk show host based in the San Francisco Bay Area. In 2004, he debuted his first one-man play, NotGenuine Black Man at the Marsh in San Francisco. His best-selling book based on Genuine is required reading in several high schools and colleges across the country. Aya de Leon is an author and activist based in Berkeley. She directs the Poetry for the People program, teaching creative writing at UC Berkeley. Since 2013, she has been blogging on race, class, gender, culture, and social justice politics.

Moderator Paula Farmer curates special panel events focusing on discussions about topical social issues, like “Race in America” and “Immigration in America.” She is Chairwoman of the Diversity & Inclusion Committee for California Independent Booksellers Association (CALIBA). Her background is in journalism.

in conversation with Helene Cooper

Jennifer Steinhauer’s latest work, The Firsts, breathtakingly chronicles the first-year experiences of the history-making women who entered Congress in November 2018, detailing their transition from running trailblazing campaigns to the daily work of governance.

Jennifer went to work for The New York Times as a news clerk when she was still a journalism student at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. She has covered health care and business in New York, was City Hall bureau chief, Los Angeles bureau chief, congressional correspondent, Mid-Atlantic correspondent and veterans reporter.

Teaming with co-author and friend Jessica Hendra, Jennifer capped her years in Los Angeles with a satirical novel Beverly Hills Adjacent, at times hilarious, at times touching, that sends up the television industry and the ways of those in and near the entertainment industry.

One of the earliest writers for Food52, Jennifer has been writing about food, sharing her recipes and entertaining her public for years. Her first cookbook, Treat Yourself, taught us how to make our own junk food, at home. She then teamed with friend and colleague Frank Bruni to extol the power and diversity of the lowly meat loaf, in A Meat Loaf in Every Oven.

Helene Cooper is a Pentagon correspondent with The New York Times. She joined the paper in 2004 as assistant editorial page editor, before becoming diplomatic correspondent in 2006 and White House correspondent in 2009.

in conversation with Bill Petrocelli

Michael Connelly‘s new release, Fair Warning, returns readers to the world of Jack McEvoy, the journalist who never backs down, as he tracks a serial killer who has been operating completely under the radar–until now.

Michael is the bestselling author of over thirty novels and one work of nonfiction. With over seventy-four million copies of his books sold worldwide and translated into forty foreign languages, he is one of the most successful writers working today.

A former newspaper reporter who worked the crime beat at the Los Angeles Times and the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, Michael has won numerous awards for his journalism and his fiction. His very first novel, The Black Echo, won the prestigious Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award for Best First Novel in 1992. In 2002, Clint Eastwood directed and starred in the movie adaptation of Connelly’s 1998 novel, Blood Work. In March 2011, the movie adaptation of his #1 bestselling novel, The Lincoln Lawyer, hit theaters worldwide starring Matthew McConaughey as Mickey Haller. His most recent #1 New York Times bestsellers include Dark Sacred Night, The Late Show, Two Kinds Of Truth, The Late Show, The Wrong Side Of Goodbye, The Crossing, The Burning Room, The Gods of Guilt, The Black Box, and The Drop.

Michael is the executive producer of Bosch, an Amazon Studios original drama series based on his bestselling character Harry Bosch, starring Titus Welliver and streaming on Amazon Prime. He is also the executive producer of the documentary films, Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story and Tales Of the American. He spends his time in California and Florida.

Bill Petrocelli is co-owner of Book Passage and author of the novels The Circle of Thirteen and Through the Bookstore Window. He is also the author of the soon-to-be-published Electoral Bait & Switch: How the Electoral College Hurts American Voters.

in conversation with R.O. Kwon

Téa Obreht’s new novel, Inland: A Novel, is an imaginatively mythic journey across the American West that was named one of the best books of the 2019 by publications including Time, The Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal  and BookPage.

Téa is also the author of The Tiger’s Wife, a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the 2011 Orange Prize for Fiction. An international bestseller, it has sold over a million copies worldwide, with rights sold in 37 countries.

Téa was a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree and was named by The New Yorker as one of the twenty best American fiction writers under forty. She was the 2013 Rona Jaffe Foundation fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers and was a recipient of the 2016 National Endowment for the Arts fellowship.

She was born in Belgrade, in the former Yugoslavia, in 1985 and has lived in the United States since the age of twelve. She currently lives in New York City and teaches at Hunter College.

R.O. Kwon’s nationally bestselling first novel, The Incendiaries, is being translated into seven languages. Named a best book of the year by over forty publications, The Incendiaries received the Housatonic Book Award and was a finalist or nominated for seven other prizes, including the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Award for Best First Book and Los Angeles Times First Book Prize. Kwon’s next novel, as well as an essay collection, are forthcoming.

R.O’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Paris Review, NPR, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Yaddo, MacDowell, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Born in Seoul, Kwon has lived most of her life in the United States.

in conversation with Alison Gopnik

Jane Hirshfield‘s recently released collection, Ledger: Poems has been hailed as the most important and masterly work of her career.

Jane, one of our most celebrated contemporary poets. is the author of nine collections of poetry, including the newly released Ledger; The Beauty, long-listed for the National Book Award and a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2015; Come, Thief; After, named a Best Book of 2006 by The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, and the Financial Times, and a finalist for England’s prestigious T.S. Eliot Prize; Given Sugar, Given Salt finalist for the 2001 National Book Critics Circle Award, and winner of the Bay Area Book Reviewers Award; The Lives of the Heart; The October Palace; Of Gravity & Angels, winner of the Poetry Center Book Award; and Alaya.

Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley, where she has taught since 1988. She received her BA from McGill University and her PhD from Oxford University. She is a world leader in cognitive science, particularly the study of children’s learning and development.

She is the author of over 100 articles and several books including Words, Thoughts and Theories (coauthored with Andrew Meltzoff), The Scientist in the Crib (coauthored with Andrew Meltzoff and Patricia Kuhl),  and The Philosophical Baby; What children’s minds tell us about love, truth and the meaning of life. She has also written for Science, The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, New Scientist, and Slate.

in conversation with Elaine Petrocelli

John Grisham is the #1 New York Times bestselling author whose latest release, Camino Winds, brings readers back to paradise for a little sun, sand, mystery, and mayhem.

Since first publishing A Time to Kill in 1988, John has written one novel a year and all of them have become international bestsellers. There are currently over 300 million John Grisham books in print worldwide, which have been translated into 40 languages. Nine of his novels have been turned into films (The Firm, The Pelican Brief, The Client, A Time to Kill, The Rainmaker, The Chamber, A Painted House, The Runaway Jury, and Skipping Christmas), as was an original screenplay, The Gingerbread Man.

The Innocent Man (October 2006) marked his first foray into non-fiction, and Ford County (November 2009) was his first short story collection.

Elaine Petrocelli is co-owner of Book Passage, the fiercely independent bookstore in Corte Madera, California, and at the San Francisco Ferry Building . Over the past 44 years, Book Passage has hosted more than 10,000 classes, conferences, and author events, featuring Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Salman Rushdie, John McCain, Al Gore, Jimmy Carter, Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and thousands of new writers. She hosts of the Conversations with Authors series with Isabel Allende, Khaled Hosseini, Anne Lamott, Dave Eggers and other great writers.

in conversation with Phil Cousineau

Joan Ryan‘s fascinating new Intangibles: Unlocking the Science and Soul of Team Chemistry explores how team chemistry—that perfect combination of biological and social forces that boosts selfless effort—drives sports teams toward a common goal, encourages players to be the best versions of themselves, and pushes individuals to exceed their own potential as they work together.

Joan is an award-winning journalist and author. She was one of the first female sports columnists in the country, and has covered every major sporting event, from the Super Bowl to the Olympics and championship fights. Her work has earned her thirteen Associated Press Sports Editors Awards, the National Headliner Award and the Women’s Sports Foundation’s Journalism Award by the San Francisco chapter of the National Organization for Women. Her book Little Girls in Pretty Boxes: The Making and Breaking of Elite Gymnasts and Figure Skaters was named one of the Top 100 Sports Books of All Time by Sports Illustrated (the only one to be authored by a woman), and one of the Top 50 Sports Books of All Time by the Guardian. Joan now works as a media consultant to the San Francisco Giants.

in conversation with Jaquira Diaz

Julia Alvarez‘s stunning new novel, Afterlife, is set in the current political moment of tribalism and distrust, and asks: What do we owe those in crisis in our families, including—maybe especially—members of our human family? How do we live in a broken world without losing faith in one another or ourselves? And how do we stay true to those glorious souls we have lost?

Julia left the Dominican Republic for the United States in 1960 at the age of ten. She is the author of six novels, three books of nonfiction, three collections of poetry, and eleven books for children and young adults. She has taught and mentored writers in schools and communities across America and, until her retirement in 2016, was a writer-in-residence at Middlebury College. Her work has garnered wide recognition, including a Latina Leader Award in Literature from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, the Hispanic Heritage Award in Literature, the Woman of the Year by Latina magazine, and inclusion in the New York Public Library’s program “The Hand of the Poet: Original Manuscripts by 100 Masters, from John Donne to Julia Alvarez.” In the Time of the Butterflies, with over one million copies in print, was selected by the National Endowment for the Arts for its national Big Read program, and in 2013 President Obama awarded Alvarez the National Medal of Arts in recognition of her extraordinary storytelling.
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in conversation with Matt Nathanson

Kelly Corrigan‘s Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say is a wonderfully personal, honest, and hilarious examination of the essential phrases that make love and connection possible.

Kelly has been called “the voice of her generation” by O: The Oprah Magazine and “the poet laureate of the ordinary” by HuffPost. She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The Middle Place, Lift, and Glitter and Glue. She is also the creative director of The Nantucket Project and host of their conversation series about what matters most. She lives near Oakland, California, with her husband, Edward Lichty, and her daughters, Georgia and Claire.

Matt Nathanson has evolved into one of the most applauded songwriters and engaging performers on the music scene today. His 2007 album, Some Mad Hope, yielded his breakthrough multi-platinum hit “Come on Get Higher.” His 2013 release, Last of The Great Pretenders, debuted at #16 on the Billboard Top 200 while hitting #1 on iTunes’ Alternative Albums chart. Nathanson has performed on The Howard Stern Show, Ellen, CONAN, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Dancing with the Stars, Rachael Ray, and The CMA Awards to name a few.

His most recent album, Sings His Sad Heart spawned the hit single “Used To Be” which was a chart climber – hitting top 15 at Hot AC and is streaming a million streams a month.

Lori Gottlieb’s new Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed invites us into Lori’s world as both clinician and patient, examining the truths and fictions we tell ourselves and others as we teeter on the tightrope between love and desire, meaning and mortality, guilt and redemption, terror and courage, hope and change. Rick Hanson’s latest, the ground-breaking Neurodharma, explores the new neuroscience of awakening and offers a bold, plausible plan for reverse-engineering peak experiences, sense of oneness, and even enlightenment itself.

Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and author of the New York Times bestseller Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, which is being adapted as a television series by Eva Longoria and the creators of Emmy and Golden Globe-winning series “The Americans.” In addition to her clinical practice, she writes The Atlantic’s weekly “Dear Therapist” advice column and contributes regularly to The New York Times and many other publications. Her recent TED Talk is one of the top 10 most watched of the year, and she is a sought-after expert in media such as The Today Show, Good Morning America, The CBS Early Show, CNN, and NPR’s “Fresh Air.” Her new iHeart Radio podcast, “Dear Therapists,” produced by Katie Couric, will premiere this year. Learn more at LoriGottlieb.com.

Rick Hanson, PhD is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, and New York Times best-selling author. His books have been published in 29 languages and include Neurodharma, Resilient, Hardwiring Happiness, Buddha’s Brain, Just One Thing, and Mother Nurture – with 900,000 copies in English alone.

in conversation with Isabel Allende

Adam Hochschild‘s Rebel Cinderella: From Rags to Riches to Radical tells the astonishing but forgotten story of an immigrant sweatshop worker who married an heir to a great American fortune and became one of the most charismatic radical leaders of her time.

He is the author of ten books. King Leopold’s Ghost was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, as was To End All Wars. His Bury the Chains was a finalist for the National Book Award and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and PEN USA Literary Award. He lives in Berkeley, California.

Isabel Allende—novelist, feminist, and philanthropist—is one of the most widely-read authors in the world, having sold more than 74 million books. In addition to her work as a writer, Allende devotes much of her time to human rights causes. In 1996, following the death of her daughter Paula, she established a charitable foundation in her honor, which has awarded grants to more than 100 nonprofits worldwide, delivering life-changing care to hundreds of thousands of women and girls. More than 8 million have watched her TED Talks on leading a passionate life.

in conversation with Jennifer Barth

Jacqueline Winspear‘s The American Agent was published in 2019, as was What Would Maisie Do? – a non-fiction book based on her acclaimed Masie Dobbs series.

Jacqueline is the creator of the award-winning New York Times and National Bestselling series featuring psychologist and investigator, Maisie Dobbs. Jacqueline’s “standalone” novel set in WW1, The Care and Management of Lies, was a finalist for the 2015 Dayton Literary Peace Prize. Her memoir, This Time Next Year We’ll Be Laughing, will be published in November. Originally from the UK, Jacqueline now lives in northern California.

in conversation with Michael Krasny

Erik Larson is the author of six New York Times bestsellers, including Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania, which hit no. 1 on the Times list soon after launch, and his newest book, The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz. The latter is in large part a domestic drama that examines how Winston Churchill and his “Secret Circle” really went about surviving the German air campaign of 1940-41. Erik’s The Devil in the White City is set to be a Hulu limited series; his In the Garden of Beasts is under option by Tom Hanks, for a feature film. Erik lives in Manhattan with his wife, who is a writer and retired neonatologist; they have three grown daughters.

in conversation with Kathryn Belden

Lisa See’s new novel, The Island of Sea Women, is about the free-diving women of South Korea’s Jeju Island. Lisa is also the New York Times bestselling author of The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, Peony in Love, Shanghai Girls, China Dolls, and Dreams of Joy, which debuted at #1. She is also the author of On Gold Mountain, which tells the story of her Chinese American family’s settlement in Los Angeles. Lisa has also written a mystery series that takes place in China. Her books have been published in 39 languages.

in conversation with Yeganeh Rezaian

Jason Rezaian served as Tehran bureau chief for the Washington Post and is now an opinion writer for the paper and contributor to CNN. He was convicted—but never sentenced—of espionage in a closed-door trial in Iran in 2015. He lives in Washington, DC, with his wife. His book Prisoner: My 544 Days in an Iranian Prison, published in January 2019, details his experience in captivity in Iran.

in conversation with Dave Eggers

Colum McCann is the author of seven novels and three collections of stories. Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, he has been the recipient of many international honors, including the National Book Award, the International Dublin Impac Prize, a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government, election to the Irish arts academy, several European awards, the 2010 Best Foreign Novel Award in China, and an Oscar nomination. In 2017 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts. His work has been published in over 40 languages. He is the co-founder of the non-profit global story exchange organization, Narrative 4, and he teaches at the MFA program in Hunter College. He lives in New York with his wife, Allison, and their family.

in conversation with Elaine Petrocelli

Khaled Hosseini was born in Kabul, Afghanistan, and moved to the United States in 1980. He is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The Kite Runner, A Thousand Splendid Suns, and And the Mountains Echoed. Hosseini is also a U.S. Goodwill Envoy to the UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, and the founder of The Khaled Hosseini Foundation, a nonprofit that provides humanitarian assistance to the people of Afghanistan.

Elaine Petrocelli is co-owner of Book Passage, the fiercely independent bookstore in Corte Madera, California, and at the San Francisco Ferry Building . Over the past 44 years, Book Passage has hosted more than 10,000 classes, conferences, and author events, featuring Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Salman Rushdie, John McCain, Al Gore, Jimmy Carter, Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and thousands of new writers. She hosts of the Conversations with Authors series with Isabel Allende, Khaled Hosseini, Anne Lamott, Dave Eggers and other great writers.

in conversation with Tom Barbash

Dave Eggers is the author of many books, including The Circle, The Monk of Mokha, What is the What, A Hologram for the King, and The Lifters. He is founder of McSweeney’s, an independent publishing company based in San Francisco that produces books, a humor website, and a journal of new writing, McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern. McSweeney’s also publishes Voice of Witness, a nonprofit book series that uses oral history to illuminate human rights crises around the world. He is the co-founder of 826 National, a network of youth writing and tutoring centers around the United States.

in conversation with Sam Lamott

Anne Lamott is the author of seven novels, Hard Laughter, Rosie, Joe Jones, Blue Shoe, All New People, Crooked Little Heart, and Imperfect Birds. She has also written several bestselling books of nonfiction, including, Operating Instructions, an account of life as a single mother during her son’s first year; Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son’s First Son; and the classic book on writing; Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life.

in conversation with Don George

Isabel Allende—novelist, feminist, and philanthropist—is one of the most widely-read authors in the world, having sold more than 74 million books. In addition to her work as a writer, Allende devotes much of her time to human rights causes. In 1996, following the death of her daughter Paula, she established a charitable foundation in her honor, which has awarded grants to more than 100 nonprofits worldwide, delivering life-changing care to hundreds of thousands of women and girls. More than 8 million have watched her TED Talks on leading a passionate life.

in conversation with Juliet Grames

Cara Black is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of 19 books in the Private Investigator Aimée Leduc series, which is set in Paris. Cara has received multiple nominations for the Anthony and Macavity Awards, a Washington Post Book World Book of the Year citation, the Médaille de la Ville de Paris—the Paris City Medal, which is awarded in recognition of contribution to international culture—and invitations to be the Guest of Honor at conferences such as the Paris Polar Crime Festival and Left Coast Crime. With more than 400,000 books in print, the Aimée Leduc series has been translated into German, Norwegian, Japanese, French, Spanish, Italian, and Hebrew.