Books Recommended by the Book Passage Community

What books do members of our Book Passage community recommend to others? Please add your own recommendation or click the arrow to the left of a title previously entered to affirm the recommendation of a book already on the list below.

Then, if you haven’t already, take a quick moment to follow Conversations with Authors on Facebook.

Starting Saturday, December 5th we’ll announce a name selected at random each day from among our Facebook followers. Follow us, and then check your own Facebook feed each day through year-end. (Or come back to this page each day, if you prefer.)

If your name is selected, we’ll share your choice of a fiction or non-fiction title from our Recommended Books of 2020 with you and with any friend you designate. It’s a small, fun, way to say thank you, and to extend the Book Passage circle of readers during the holiday season.

Please register or log in to vote and add your own favorite books.

  • 25

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James MacBride

    When I read an early copy of this book about six months before its release I couldn't put it down. I loved the characters, the language, the setting.

  • 25

    votes

    Where the Crawdads sing by Delia Owens

    Well written story that looks at the resiliency of the human spirit. Living with betrayal and fear, surviving against all odds, love and fear, compasssion and strength, prejudice and ignorance. A story of love in so many ways.

  • 12

    votes

    All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny

    One , if not the, best books Louise Penny has written. Intelligently and warmly written.

  • 12

    votes

    The Dutch House by Ann Patchett

  • 12

    votes

    The Overstory by Richard Powers

    Beautifully written, fascinating characters, makes me look at trees and the whole world around me differently!

  • 11

    votes

    Being Peace by Thich Nhat Hanh

  • 11

    votes

    The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    Extraordinary novel about slavery and the abolition movement, beautifully written.

  • 10

    votes

    A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

  • 10

    votes

    Educated by Tara Westover

    Amazing memoir of Tara's survivalist Mormon upbringing and her academic accomplishments. Despite no formal education until she started college, she was able to earn a PhD from Cambridge University.

  • 10

    votes

    My Own Words by Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  • 10

    votes

    The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

    A novel about 2 girls born black but looked white. Clearly about racism and the sad ramifications of it in America. Bound to be a classic in a short time.

  • 8

    votes

    A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende

  • 8

    votes

    A Promised Land by Barack Obama

    Not since Lincoln have we had a President as eloquent, diplomatic, and humble as Barack Obama. He is an engaging author. I can hear him speaking his words on every page. He gives us such a glimpse of the enormity and toll the job of being President takes on him and his family. This book consumed me as I felt I was living and feeling his every step. Even if you did not vote for him for President, you will still be able to relate and learn from his struggle as a person trying to juggle the responsibilities of a father, husband, friend, and President.

  • 8

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James MacBride

    This is a beautiful book that covers racism, drug selling and abuse, alcoholism, poverty, but also love, community, humor. It's beautifully written.

  • 8

    votes

    Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

    You will be drawn to this social misfit within the first few pages and the surprise at the end is worth the journey. Seeing the world through Eleanor's eyes is very entertaining and this debut author's writing style is refreshingly different. I even had to look up a few words!

  • 8

    votes

    The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

    Using a trove of primary documents, Larson paints an intimate portrait of Churchill and his family during his first year as prime minister. To see the lengths he went to to keep his country together and fighting through the Blitz is inspiring. A country can only hope for such a leader.

  • 7

    votes

    Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan

    How this book came to be is in and of itself a story ... but the tales of Pino Lella's childhood in Italy during the Nazi invasion are almost unbelievable -- how he survived and moved on can only be by the grace of God!

  • 7

    votes

    Delia Owens by Where the Crawdads Sing

  • 7

    votes

    The Nickel Boys by Colson Whithead

    It won the Pulitzer Prize and richly deserves it. It's out in paperback.

  • 6

    votes

    Homeland Elegies by Ayad Aktar

  • 6

    votes

    The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

    As do many books by this author, The Night Watchman describes a tribal injustice, this time with many moments of humor and some very engaging characters.

  • 5

    votes

    Caste by Isabel Wilkerson

    Amazing, tbought-provoking book about white privilege and racism in America through a historical perspective.

  • 5

    votes

    The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See

    This is a beautiful story about the the friendship of two haenyeo (sea women) that takes place on an island off the coast of South Korea. Lisa See's depiction of the haenyeo traditions and the historical events that took place is riveting.

  • 5

    votes

    The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

    Multiple layers of race, identity, loneliness, family, and secrets.

  • 5

    votes

    Three Hours In Paris by Cara Black

    I'd hoped to return to Paris, one of my favorite cities, in 2020. Of course, that didn't work out, but at least I can always armchair-travel with Cara's Aimee Leduc series, and now with this exciting historical stand-alone! A real page-turner, with a great sense of place and a strong and resourceful female lead.

  • 4

    votes

    Educated by Tara Westover

    This book has stayed in my mind and especially as I visited UT and saw the desolation of the countryside. I finally understand the ability of a family to exist in that kind of isolation.

  • 4

    votes

    Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

    If you are feeling a bit alone or confused or in a rut, reading this book is like having lunch with a therapist, who happens to be your friend. You will cry and laugh and walk away with better insight. A very easy and engaging read and one you will want to reread many times.

  • 4

    votes

    The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Richardson

    This was an unforgettable story of resiliency and the power of love amidst unbelievable hardship and cruelty. Set during the Depression in the hollers of Appalachia, the author illuminated a time and place in an authentic and powerful way.

  • 4

    votes

    The Forty Rules of Love by Elif Shafak

    2009, a terrific read.

  • 4

    votes

    The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

  • 4

    votes

    The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue

    Beautifully written, unforgettable characters.

  • 4

    votes

    The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali

    I read this early in 2020 and it has remained my favorite of the year. I wish I would see it on more lists. I love a family saga and this did not disappoint.

  • 4

    votes

    Underland by Robert MacFarlane

    author takes you underground, burials, deep matter, explores the Earth's underworld, whole cities underground quite an adventure

  • 4

    votes

    Where the Light Enters by Jill Biden

    I'm so glad I read this book prior to the election and I look forward to having Mrs. Biden as our First Lady. She is honest and deeply caring and gracious and funny! She brings out the best in those around her and reading her book is like settling into a comfy sofa with a soothing cup of coffee, reassuring you that light will enter and all will be ok...

  • 3

    votes

    A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

  • 3

    votes

    Apeirogon by Colum McCann

  • 3

    votes

    Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell

    Gorgeously-written novel, imagining the life of Shakespeare's wife and 11-year-old son Hamnet, who dies during a pandemic. A soaring and imaginative exploration of love and grief.

  • 3

    votes

    Know My Name by Chanel Miller

  • 3

    votes

    My Reading Life by Pat Conroy

    This reminiscence by the late Pat Conroy explains the demons and the joys of his troubled life. His deep appreciation for the beauty of the American south, and for rich, descriptive writing reveal a loving man whose imaginary world reached important places that his real one could not.

  • 3

    votes

    Olive Again by Elizabeth Strout

  • 3

    votes

    On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong

    A beautifully written first novel by Vuong, Semi-autobiographical, the book is in the form of a letter to the narrators mother, who cannot read, covering his journey as a young boy from Vietnam to his boyhood in Hartford, CT.

  • 3

    votes

    One By One by Ruth Ware

    I have read and loved all her books. Wonderful mystery in a contemporary setting. A nice change of pace

  • 3

    votes

    The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell by Robert Dugoni

    I couldn’t put it down—a well told tale of an exceptional child. One of the best books I’ve ever read.

  • 3

    votes

    The Flight Portfolio by Julie Orringer

    A historical novel about Varian Fry, a founder of what became the International Rescue Committee. Set in Marseille, it describes his efforts in helping Jews escape the Nazis. My favorite novel EVER, it's so beautifully written that I had to pace myself so that I wouldn't finish it too soon. Extra points for the intense romance inside.

  • 3

    votes

    The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes

    Five remarkable women come together to help Eleanor Roosevelt's traveling library come to fruition in small town mountainous Kentucky. If you believe in the power of books and root for women, you will not want to put this down. I was hooked and could not predict how it would conclude.

  • 3

    votes

    The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

    I love everything Matt Haig has written!!! But this latest book was SO SPECTACULAR!!!!😘😘😘

  • 3

    votes

    The Overstory by Richard Powers

  • 3

    votes

    Writers & Lovers by Lily King

    One of those books that you just love the experience of reading! I couldn't put it down yet wanted to stretch it out indefinitely. My favorite book of the year.

  • 2

    votes

    "The Tea Girl From Hummingbird Lane" by Lisa See

    Well-written realistic fiction novel that covers topics such as adoption, cross-cultural challenges, tea-growing, and Hill Tribes. The characters will reach out to you from the pages while you learn new information at the same time.

  • 2

    votes

    A woman of no importance by Sonia Purnell

    A wonderful riveting book about an extraordinary woman atg a time when there were very few women spies

  • 2

    votes

    All the Devils are Here by Louise Penny

  • 2

    votes

    Anxious People by Fredrik Backman

    Another fantastic story about relationships and the power of humanity. The story starts off a bit strange but stay with it as Backman draws you in with each subsequent chapter.

  • 2

    votes

    Apeirogon by Colum McCann

    The elegance and beauty of the mathematical architecture of this book keeps revealing itself. Combine this with the ever unfolding emotional story, myriad threads of history and the sciences, and the overall humanitarian message keep you thinking.

  • 2

    votes

    Apeirogon by Colum Mccann

    The book's unique structure intertwines the personal stories, historical context, and political realities of the Israeli/Palestinian situation in such a moving way.

  • 2

    votes

    Homeland Elegies by Ayad Akhtar

    A powerful book. The author has done a brilliant job of portraying what it is like to be an Asian immigrant and Muslim in today’s America. He has shown all the tensions in Parent/ child relationship when each generation is born and raised in a different country. A lot of changes he talks about have really escalated since Trump’s election.

  • 2

    votes

    News of the World by Paulette Jiles

  • 2

    votes

    Nichol Boys by Colson Whitehead

  • 2

    votes

    Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

    Don't take my word for it - tune in to Book Passage's Extended Session with Jane Smiley on Saturday, December 12th • 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET, and hear from the horse's -- um, author's --mouth why this delightful novel narrated by a thoroughbred, a German short-haired pointer, and a few feathered friends living in The City of Light is your go-to gift this season, Be sure to get one for yourself!

  • 2

    votes

    The Evening and the Morning by Ken Follett

    A riveting prequel to Pillars of the Earth. Do NOT be put off by its 900 page length. You won’t want it to end.

  • 2

    votes

    The House of Silk by Tony Horowitz

  • 2

    votes

    The Mountains Sing by Nguyen Phan Que Mai

    Astonishing novel tracing the history of Viet Nam through one family. Hope, heartbreak, perseverance, a celebration of the land, its culture and people.

  • 2

    votes

    The Once and Future Witches by Alix Harrow

    The ideas at the core of this entertaining novel are bewitching: childhood rhymes are the spells passed down from one generation of hidden witches to another. This tale centered on three sisters has a lot to say about feminism and social change.

  • 2

    votes

    The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

    I have just discovered this amazing author. This book combines science fiction, time travel, religion and the meaning of life in an epic tale with unforgettable characters.

  • 2

    votes

    This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing by Jacqueline Winspear

    Poignant memoir by the creator of Maisie Dobbs about growing up in postwar England.

  • 2

    votes

    This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing by Jacqueline Winspear

    Poignant memoir by the creator of Maisie Dobbs about growing up in postwar England.

  • 2

    votes

    Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell

    Never ending kaleidoscopic genius by time traveler extraordinaire, David Mitchell. Set in the late 60's London/SF sensory overloading rock & roll scene, you can all but taste the experience. READ IT. Then go read all his others..

  • 2

    votes

    Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore

  • 2

    votes

    What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon

    This is a brilliant story of a woman’s fascinating journey through the ages, a poignant love story, and a fascinating history of Ireland in the early 1900’s,

  • 2

    votes

    Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

    This story is so suspenseful and the writing is amazing!

  • 2

    votes

    World of Wonders by Aimee Nezhukumatathil

    The author writes about 20 natural phenomena and then weaves in aspects of her life. This is so much more than essays on nature. It is thoughtful, provocative and an absolute delight. Beautiful writing and a great holiday gift.

  • 1

    votes

    All I Ever Wanted: A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir by Kathy Valentine

    an incredible raw memoir by Kathy Valentine , bassist for the historic all girl group The Go-Gos. its a trip through her life as a woman navigating the all male world of Rock and Roll. Kathy's ability to take you on the journey with her is a great testament as her ability as an author. Raw, brilliant, sad and happy. this is not to be missed reading for 2020

  • 1

    votes

    A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher

    An adventure story about a boy and his dog at the end of the world. It’s the kind of page turner that, when I was younger, would keep me up past my curfew to read by flashlight under a bed sheet. My favorite paperback of the year.

  • 1

    votes

    A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

    I has everything - good story - great characters - good pace in writing the story -right down to the last page!

  • 1

    votes

    A Pilgrimage To Eternity by Timothy Egan

    Part history, part travel along a less well known pilgrim's path from Canterbury Cathedral to Rome by a prize winning author who makes history very interesting. I always learn so much from Timothy Egan!

  • 1

    votes

    A Pilgrimage to Eternity by Timothy Egan

    So well written, an exploring story from Canterbury to Rome, excellent

  • 1

    votes

    A Purrfect Home for Kitters by Jacqueline H. Faber

    This is a purrfect picture book for children who need to let something precious, they love, go!

  • 1

    votes

    A THOUSAND MOONS by Sebastian Barry

    Once again, I enjoyed spending time with the characters from his previous book, DAYS WITHOUT END. Beautiful writing.

  • 1

    votes

    An Atlas of Impossible Longing by Anuradha Roy

  • 1

    votes

    Apeirogon by Colum McCann

    MaCann weaves together the stories of a Jewish father and Muslim father who each lost a daughter in the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict....and then went on to found/join Combatants for Peace, where they have found friendship, healing, and hope. Beautiful, inventive writing , and an ultimately inspiring tale based on true people and events.

  • 1

    votes

    Beloved by Toni Morrison

  • 1

    votes

    Born Under a Million Shadows by Andrea Busfield

    Takes place in Afghanistan. There are difficult situations in this book but they are presented in a light and readable way.

  • 1

    votes

    Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo

    An engaging story about family, secrets, loss and resolution. A really good read for both the YA and adult audience.

  • 1

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James MacBride

  • 1

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James McBride

  • 1

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James McBride

  • 1

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James McBride

    The writing is rich and masterful. Each character has been so perfectly drawn they jump out from the page as unique individuals.

  • 1

    votes

    Deacon King Kong by James McBride

    Just brilliantly developed characters and a story that teaches one about humanity and kindness .

  • 1

    votes

    Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano

    This dual narrative about the day leading up to a plane crash that has a 12-year-old boy as its sole survivor and his resulting survivor burden rather than survivor guilt made for riveting storytelling. Survivor guilt is something most of us can imagine but the burden of survival was something I had never thought about. For lovers of foreshadowing, all chapters leading up to the plane crash are extremely thought-provoking for the reader knows everyone’s fate, including Edward’s, as they go about their day unaware. If the barometer of an excellent book is one that you are still pondering a year later, then don’t miss Dear Edward.

  • 1

    votes

    Desiree's Night Flight by Jacqueline H. Faber

    Desiree is a Monarch Butterfly that flies at night when mother and father have told her only bats, owls, and moths fly at night. She takes a risk and flies anyway, and in the end something something transformational happens!

  • 1

    votes

    Fallout by Lesley M.M. Blume

    Account of the writing of Hiroshima and the US government suppression of information about the use of the atomic bomb and the results in Hiroshima & Nagasaki. Especially interesting to read this and then read Hiroshima by John Hersey. Or Hersey first and then this.

  • 1

    votes

    From here to Equality by William A. Darity , Jr

    This nook describes in great detail about what happened to African Americans since the Civil War . It is an important read as to why reparations are necessary to truly bring equality to our nation.

  • 1

    votes

    Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

  • 1

    votes

    Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

    British womxn, mothers and daughters, pasts and futures, a glimpse into appealing (and occasionally appalling) lives of characters, with roots, however tenuously, in Africa.

  • 1

    votes

    Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck

    Retired professor in Berlin engages with African refugees seeking asylum and the right to work. Raises issues of who gets to live where, who “belongs,”who has the right to work, etc. Universal questions facing wealthy Western countries confronting refugees escaping violence, hunger and poverty. A novel written like a narrative essay.

  • 1

    votes

    Hamnet by Maggie Farrell

    Farrell wraps you up in her lyrical evocation of Shakespearean times as a plague is hovering. You become part of the life and world of Agnes and her children, and yes, the elusive Shakespeare himself. You can see, smell, hear, touch everything about their lives, and when it's over and you have mourned the loss of the young son Hamnet, you close the book with a bit of regret. Beautifully written.

  • 1

    votes

    Hamnet by O’Farrell

    Most wonderfully imagined lives of Agnes/Anne and her children by Shakespeare. Hamnet is a central character and, like his mother and sisters, tells the story of his life. Shakespeare is offstage for most of the book, but O’Farrell reveals the depths of grief he and Agnes experience at the death of their only son. A must read.

  • 1

    votes

    Hollywood Park by Mikel Jollett

    The author was raised in the Synanon cult until his mother fled with he and his brother. Excellent memoir of trying to adjust and deal with troubled parents.

  • 1

    votes

    How the South Won the Civil War by Heather Cox Richardson

    a book for our times....fascinating history

  • 1

    votes

    How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid

    It touched my heart.

  • 1

    votes

    In a Holidaze by Christina Lauren

    The perfect feel good holiday read. It has time travel, romance, comedy, angst and a host of unique characters. I could not put this book down and read it in 5 days.

  • 1

    votes

    Insecurity System by Sara Wainscott

    A lovely book of poetry in the sonnet form

  • 1

    votes

    Insecurity System Poems by Sara Wainscott

    Beautiful poetry by the 2019 winner of the Lexi Rudnitsky First Book prize in poetry!

  • 1

    votes

    Lab Girl by Hope Jahren

    This is a memoir about how Hope became a scientist -- she sees life with her heart, in the same way she sees the plant world.

  • 1

    votes

    Long Bright River by Liz Moore

    Well written, indepth relationship between two sisters. Older with police, younger a drug addict.

  • 1

    votes

    Mississippi Solo by Eddy L. Harris

    memoir of an African American man's solo journey down the Mississippi River from its origin in Minnesota to New Orleans in the mid-80's and what he learns about the river and himself.

  • 1

    votes

    Old Filth Trilogy by Jane Gardem

    There are 3 books that should be read in order. I think they are masterpieces of British history and society, character development and language. Mostly overlooked

  • 1

    votes

    Prairie Sonata by Sandy Shefrin Rabin

    This is a thoughtful, stunning novel, a coming of age story about music, love, friendship, community, and religion. Told from the perspective of a woman looking back at herself as a young adult, it is a book for all ages. At times, the words flow on to the pages like poetry.

  • 1

    votes

    Rose by Martin Cruz Smith

    Vivid characters, good story, you learn about what its like to work underground. I did not see the possibly ending. Really enjoyed!

  • 1

    votes

    Sailing To Byzantium by Maureen Freeley

    I reccommend "Sailing Through Byzantium" 2013 by Maureen Freeley. She resides and teaches in England and is the President of Pen, but used to live in the Bay Area in the early '80s. In this novel she captures the intricate and nefarious political currents in Turkey of the '60s and '70s. U.S. academics (possibly CIA) and Turkish students at The American College of Istanbul (Rogers College) lead double lives and become embroiled in local and international intrigue.

  • 1

    votes

    Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl

  • 1

    votes

    Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart

  • 1

    votes

    Simon the Fiddler by Paulette Jiles

  • 1

    votes

    Spring by Ali Smith

    Fourth and last book in a series. Each book can stand alone. For the adventurous reader. Cultural commentary.

  • 1

    votes

    The Cold Millions by Jess Walter

    This historical fiction novel, set in 1910, links in many ways to our current time. Compelling story line, memorable characters, excellent dialogue, vivid descriptions, well done humor

  • 1

    votes

    The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe

    Don't let the title scare you. This book is more about love, connection, living life to the fullest and the strength of this amazing woman and her son Will Schwalbe.

  • 1

    votes

    The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe

    Don't let the title scare you. This book is more about love, connection, living life to the fullest and the strength of this amazing woman and her son Will Schwalbe.

  • 1

    votes

    The Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson

    This book has it all... mystery, crime, natural history, human obsession. The true story of the largest natural history heist of the century. A non-fiction book that reads like fiction and will hold you in its grip. For nature lovers and mystery aficionados.

  • 1

    votes

    The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes

  • 1

    votes

    The Henna Artist by Alka Joshi

    It's a book about a woman who rises above some devastating circumstances to find her place in the world. The author has thoughtfully included a wonderful glossary of terms.

  • 1

    votes

    The House of Glass by Hadley Freeman

    An astonishing account of Freeman's relatives in the 20th century - four siblings who fled the pogroms of their Polish village to make their way to safety in Paris. Then World War II arrived, and they were no longer safe. Decades of research reveal the stories of what Freeman learned about her long dead family. Extremely well-written, it will keep you engrossed, page after page.

  • 1

    votes

    The Invidible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E, Schwab

    Imaginative, thought-provoking

  • 1

    votes

    The Lacunba by Barbara Kingsolver

    excellent writer, unusual story; Barbara has a wonderful imagination .... It is a little slow to start, but just wait!

  • 1

    votes

    The Last Children of Mill Creek by Vivian Gibson

    Lyrical, closely observed memoir of growing up in a segregated St. Louis neighborhood in the Fifties. Gibson's parents and her seven siblings lived in 800 square feet and tackled life with hard work, creativity, and self-reliance. This is the story of a black community lost to "urban renewal" and time. Unputdownable.

  • 1

    votes

    The Last Tea Bowl Thief by Jonelle Patrick

    A mystery with depth set in the author's beloved Japan. Beautifully written, it combines historical and modern Japan in an intriguing story.

  • 1

    votes

    The Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson

    Robinson is writing the best climate-change fiction I know of. Like his other novels, this one is hopeful, intelligent, imaginative, and surprising.

  • 1

    votes

    The Nickel Boys by Colson Whithead

    It won the Pulitzer and richly deserves it. It's out in paperback.

  • 1

    votes

    The Overstory by Richard Powers

  • 1

    votes

    The Overstory by Richard Powers

    Compelling, skillfully woven together, unforgettable characters, beautifully written, a timeless perspective

  • 1

    votes

    The Splendid and the Vile by Larson Erik

    Makes you realize what the English went thru before the US joined the fight against Germany. And what a unique man Churchill was.

  • 1

    votes

    The Stationery Shop by Marian Kamali

    I loved learning about another country’s history while reading a love story.

  • 1

    votes

    The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

    Rather than writing "about issues" the author tells amazing stories of fascinating individuals you truly care for as a reader. And sure enough, the important issues of race, gender etc. surface naturally in the stories because they are present in the society. And I, for myself, kept thinking about them for a long time after I (with great regret) finished the last page. This is the power of great storytelling.

  • 1

    votes

    The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    A moving, well constructed story you’ll not want to end.

  • 1

    votes

    This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger

    Captivating storyline and beautifully written.

  • 1

    votes

    This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger

    In 1932 the desire for a better life gave three orphaned boys the will to runaway from the abusive "home" for children and search for love and a family.

  • 1

    votes

    This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing by Jacqueline Winspear

    Poignant memoir by the creator of Maisie Dobbs about growing up in postwar England.

  • 1

    votes

    This Time Next Year We'll Be Laughing by Jacqueline Winspear

    Poignant memoir by the creator of Maisie Dobbs about growing up in postwar England.

  • 1

    votes

    Troublesome Young Men by Lynne Olson

  • 1

    votes

    Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

  • 1

    votes

    Where the Crawdads sing by Delia Owens

  • 1

    votes

    Where the Crawdads sing by Delia Owens

    This book moved me in such a special way! I thought it was written beautifully and the real emotional journey was felt for weeks after completing the book.

  • 0

    votes

    Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn

    Kuehn writes for young adults but I've read each one through within several days of receiving. The development of the characters draws one in as though you're observing the action in person and the twists and turns are smooth, surprising and thrilling. When you see a person, do you really know them or rushing to judgement.

  • 0

    votes

    Grant by Ron Chernow

    A bit long but so much to learn about a President.

  • 0

    votes

    Mountains Wild by Sarah Stewart Taylor

  • 0

    votes

    My Country tis of thee by david harris

  • 0

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    THe Road by Cormac McCarthy

    So well written ... so thought provoking... so alarming ... so terrible ... so wonderful .... the book NOT the movie.

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    The Pilars of Hercules by Paul Theroux

    I'm reading it again - can't travel due to pandemic now - Paul describles his own thought and feelings while talking with ordinary people - I feel like he is in my living room, sitting on a chair next to the fire -and then I feel like I have traveled with him.

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    Wild Silence by Raynor Winn

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    homeland elegies by ayad akhtar